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Incorporate Massage Blog

How to Pick the Best Office Massage Service Provider for Your Company

Posted by Amelia Wilcox on Jul 27, 2015 8:00:00 AM

What we do here at Incorporate Massage isn't a good fit for every single business. And there are a lot of workplace massage choices out there to choose from that fit different businesses, corporate cultures, and budgets.

What we are going to do in this article is explore and compare the different options out there for office massage services so you can find the option that works best for your situation.

office massage service

 


What are my options for office massage service providers?


 

#1. Bring in an individual massage therapist as a contractor

This option may a good fit for smaller offices that don't need more than one massage therapist to take care of their team. This can also be more cost effective than hiring a corporate massage firm, as individuals may charge less for their services.

Having a contractor come in to offer massages to your employees is also ideal if you are wanting the employees to pay for the massages themselves. This way the massage therapist can be set up as a vendor and the employees can pay their massage directly to the therapist when they come in.

Related: Office Massage Services: Can Employees Pay? 

Of course, that means they therapist will be in charge of their own schedule and payment terms with your employees. And some companies have issues here when it comes to corporate non-solicitation policies.

You will also need to consider what your plan of action will be if that therapist departs so you don't make your employees mad if that benefit is no longer available. 

 

corporate chair massage quote

 

#2. Hire massage therapists in-house as employees

Companies like Google and MindBody hire their own therapists in-house as employees, and it works for them. This may be a good route to go if you are going to have massage therapists there doing corporate massage so often that it's cheaper to pay them a salary than to pay their fees.

Of course you will be responsible for their taxes and benefits just like any other employee. And you also have to go through interviews and hiring, then may have to do it all over again if they ever leave.

Also, be aware that you will be responsible for monitoring their licensing, certification, and compliance, and your company will be exposed to liability for the massages if you bring them in as an employee. But that might be the way to go for your organization.

Related: Scheduling a Chair Massage Event: 5 Keys for Smooth Appointment Flow 

 

#3. Hire a local corporate massage company

This is a good fit for companies with a single location who may be large enough to need more than one massage therapist. This is also good for an office who wants variety or doesn't want to deal with the headache of finding a massage therapist to hire directly themselves.

Since most local companies who offer office massage services also have a brick and mortar location, this is a good fit for companies who want an option that their employees can visit outside of work for more therapy.

Just be aware that this can also be a conflict with corporate non-solicitation policies if the massage therapist is handing out their cards to drum up business at their offsite location. So just be sure to set good ground rules with the company before moving forward.

 

#4. Hire a national corporate massage company

A national chair massage company is the way to go if you have a business with multiple locations across the U.S. This is also ideal if you are looking for a standard of service across all your offices and you prefer to deal with one contact specifically for the whole program, instead of location by location.

A national corporate massage company can typically manage scheduling online, and they have systems in place to monitor licensing and compliance, and manage liability across the board.

And in most cases you can negotiate price based on full contract value for all your locations instead of per office, which really helps to control costs if you have one office in a more expensive area like L.A. or NYC.

 
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Topics: corporate massage questions