Anxiety and Massage

 
  • Forty-six adults were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a standard treatment control group. Those assigned to the massage therapy group were massaged by a therapist once a week for a 4-week period. The massage therapy group versus the control group had lower anxiety and depressed mood scores, as well as decreased sleep disturbances(Field, T., Diego, M., Delgado, J., Garcia, D., Fink, C. G. Hand pain is reduced by massage therapy. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, March 2011.) Abstract
  • This pilot study on cardiovascular patients showed statistically and clinically significant decreases in pain, anxiety, and tension scores were observed for patients who received a 20-minute massage compared with those who received standard care. (Cutshall, Susanne M; Wentworth, Laura J; Engen, Deborah; Sundt, Thoralf M; Kelly, Ryan F; Bauer, Brent A. Effect of massage therapy on pain, anxiety, and tension in cardiac surgical patients: a pilot study. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. 16(2):92-5, 2010 May.) Abstract
  • In a 2010 study, therapist observation and patient feedback suggested that massage therapy may lead to a state of increased relaxation, decreased stress, decreased muscle tension, and improved sleep(Dicks, K., Philippe Rizek, P. Massage Therapy Techniques as Pain Management for Erythromelalgia: A Case Report. International Journal Therapeutic Massage Bodywork, 2010; 3(4): 5-9.) Abstract
  • This randomized, controlled clinical trial conducted from June 2008 to January 2009 was performed on eighty-two adult patients receiving inpatient treatment for psychoactive drug withdrawal. Chair massage was more effective in reducing anxiety than relaxation. (Black, S., Jacques, K., Webber, A., Spurr, K., Carey, E., Hebb, A., and Gilbert, R. Chair Massage for Treating Anxiety in Patients Withdrawing from Psychoactive Drugs. Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine, Sep 2010, Vol. 16 Issue 9, p979-987.) Abstract
  • Study to examine the effectiveness of a daily 20 minute massage therapy program in reducing stress and aggression on a young adult psychiatric inpatient unit over seven weeks. There was a significant reduction in anxiety, resting heart rate and cortisol levels immediately following massage therapy sessions. Significant improvements in hostility and depression scores were observed. Massage therapy had immediate beneficial effects on anxiety-related measures(Garner, B., Phillips, L., Schmidt, H., Markulev, C., O’Connor, J., Wood, S., Berger, G., Burnett, P., McGorry, P. Pilot study evaluating the effect of massage therapy on stress, anxiety and aggression in a young adult psychiatric inpatient unit. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 2008, Vol. 42, No. 5 , Pages 414-422.) Abstract
  • Randomized controlled trial on sixty nurses for five week study on receiving a 15 minute back massage once a week. The control group did not receive any therapy. Anxiety and stress scores decreased over the five weeks for those participants who received a weekly massage. The stress scores of the control group increased over the five week period. (Bost, N., Wallis, M. The effectiveness of a 15 minute weekly massage in reducing physical and psychological stress in nurses. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing. 23(4):28-33, 2006 Jun-Aug.) Abstract
  • Forty patients with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation control group. The massage group attended a 50-min session twice per week for 3 weeks and the relaxation group relaxed in a lying down position on the same schedule. The massage therapy group showed decreases in depressed mood, anxiety and regional pain(Field, T., Delage, J., Hernandez-Reif, M. Movement and massage therapy reduce fibromyalgia pain. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2003, Pages 49-52.) Abstract
  • Twenty-four adult fibromyalgia patients were assigned randomly to a massage therapy or relaxation therapy group. They received 30-minute treatments twice weekly for 5 weeks. Both groups showed a decrease in anxiety and depressed mood immediately after the first and last therapy sessions. However, across the course of the study, only the massage therapy group reported an increase in the number of sleep hours and a decrease in their sleep movements. In addition, substance P levels decreased, and the patients’ physicians assigned lower disease and pain ratings and rated fewer tender points in the massage therapy group. (Field, T., Diego, M., Cullen, C., Hernandez-Reif, M., Sunshine, W., Douglas, S. Fibromyalgia Pain and Substance P Decrease and Sleep Improves After Massage Therapy. Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, April 2002 – Volume 8 – Issue 2 – pp 72-76.) Abstract
  • Thirty-four breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to a massage group or a control group. Patients of the massage group received two 30-min massages per week for 5 weeks. Depression and anxious depression were significantly reduced immediately after massage compared to the control group. (Krohn, M., Listing, M., Tjahjono, G., Reisshauer, A., Peters, E., Klapp, B.E., Rauchfuss, M. Depression, mood, stress, and Th1/Th2 immune balance in primary breast cancer patients undergoing classical massage therapy. Supportive Care in Cancer, Volume 19, Number 9, 1303-1311.) Abstract
  • This study evaluated the effectiveness of an on-site chair massage therapy program in reducing anxiety levels of employees. Subjects participated in the chair massage therapy program or break therapy (control group) for 6 weeks for 15 minutes a week. Significant reductions in anxiety and stress levels were found for the massage group. (Shulman, K.R., Jones, G.E. The Effectiveness of Massage Therapy Intervention on Reducing Anxiety in the Workplace. Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 32(2): 160-173; Jn 1996.) Abstract
  • Adults were given a chair massage, and control group adults were asked to relax in a chair for 15 minutes, two times a week for five weeks. Frontal delta power increased for both groups, suggesting increased relaxation. The massage group showed decreased alpha and beta power, and increased speed and accuracy on math computations. At the end of the five-week period depression scores were lower for both groups but job stress decreased only for the massage group. (Field, T., Ironson, G., Scafidi, F., Nawrocki, T.,Goncalves, A., Burman, I. , Pickens, J., Fox, N., Schanberg, S., & Kuhn, C.. Massage therapy reduces anxiety and enhances EEG pattern of alertness and math computations. International Journal of Neuroscience, (1996) Vol. 86, 197-205.) Abstract
  • Thirty-two people received ten 30-minute sessions of massage therapy or relaxation therapy over a five-week period. Subjects were randomly assigned to each group. Although both groups reported lower anxiety following their first and final sessions, only the massage therapy group showed behavioral and stress hormone changes, including a decrease in anxious behavior, heart rate and cortisol levels. (Field, T., Grizzle, N., Scafidi, F., & Schanberg, S. (1996). Massage and relaxation therapies’ effects on depressed adolescent mothers. Adolescence, 31, 903-911.) Abstract
  • Adult subjects were randomly assigned to a massage therapy, a transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS), or a transcutaneous electrical stimulation no-current group for 30-minute treatment sessions two times per week for 5 weeks. The massage therapy subjects reported lower anxiety and depression, and their cortisol levels were lower immediately after the therapy sessions on the first and last days of the study. The TENS group showed similar changes, but only after therapy on the last day of the study. (Sunshine, W., Field, T.M., Quintino, O., Fierro, K., Kuhn, C., Burman, I. & Schanberg, S. (1996). Fibromyalgia benefits from massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, 2, 18-22.) Abstract