Depression and Massage

 
  • Researchers examined the effects of massage therapy including aromatherapy massage and observed a reduced state and trait anxiety, and improved mood, depression, and quality of life (QoL) in healthy people. Finding showed that massage therapy  can decrease the scores of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and psychological confusion of Profile of Mood State in healthy volunteers. Furthermore, it was recognized that patients with mild depression was ameliorated by aromatherapy massage. In conclusion, massage therapy  in cancer patients would be beneficial for the reduction of anxiety, depression, and stress as well as pain, and is generally safe. (Imanishi, J. Effect of Massage Therapy on Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients. Evidence-based Anticancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 4, pp 35-51, 2013.) Abstract

 

  • Patients at all stages of cancer, recruited from oncology outpatient clinics and screening eight or more for anxiety and/or depression on the HADS, were randomized to Treatment as Usual (TAU) plus up to eight sessions weekly of either Massage Therapy or CBT, offered within 3 months. The POMS was collected at baseline and 3 and 6 months post baseline. Both packages were well received. The preference was for Massage Therapy. Significant improvements in Total Mood, depression and anxiety scores occurred. (Serfaty, M., Wilkinson, S., Freeman, C., Mannix, K. and King, M., The ToT Study: Helping with Touch or Talk (ToT). Psycho-Oncology, 21: 563–569. 2012) Abstract

 

  • Surveys of 219 ovarian cancer patients undergoing treatment received massage therapy. Patients who used massage therapy had significantly lower hopelessness scores(Gross, A., Cromwell, J., Fonteyn, M., Matulonis, U., Hayman, L., Hopelessness and Complementary Therapy Use in Patients With Ovarian Cancer. Cancer Nursing, October 2012.) Abstract

 

  • Forty-six adults were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a standard treatment control group. Those assigned to the massage therapy group were massaged by a therapist had lower anxiety and depressed mood scores decreased, as well as decreased sleep disturbances. (Field, T., Diego, M., Delgado, J., Garcia, D., Fink, C. G. Hand pain is reduced by massage therapy. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, March 2011.) Abstract
  • Forty patients with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation control group. The massage group attended a 50-min session twice per week for 3 weeks and the relaxation group relaxed in a lying down position on the same schedule. The massage therapy group showed decreases in depressed moodanxiety and regional pain. (Field, T., Delage, J., Hernandez-Reif, M. Movement and massage therapy reduce fibromyalgia pain. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2003, Pages 49-52.) Abstract
  • Twenty-four adult patients were assigned randomly to a massage therapy or relaxation therapy group. They received 30-minute treatments twice weekly for 5 weeks. Both groups showed a decrease in anxiety and depressed mood immediately after the first and last therapy sessions. However, across the course of the study, only the massage therapy group reported an increase in the number of sleep hours and a decrease in their sleep movements. In addition, substance P levels decreased, and the patients’ physicians assigned lower disease and pain ratings and rated fewer tender points in the massage therapy group. (Field, T., Diego, M.,  Cullen, C., Hernandez-Reif, M.,  Sunshine, W., Douglas, S. Fibromyalgia Pain and Substance P Decrease and Sleep Improves After Massage Therapy. Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, April 2002 – Volume 8 – Issue 2 – pp 72-76.) Abstract
  • A study on massage showed that the massage therapy group had lower depression and anxiety scores and lower cortisol levels than the control group. Long-term effects suggested that the massage therapy group had lower depression, emotional distress and somatic symptom scores, more hours of sleep and lower epinephrine and cortisol levels. (Field, T, Sunshine, W., Hernandez- Reif, M., Quintino, O., Schanberg, S., Kuhn, C., & Burman, I. (1997). Chronic fatigue syndrome: massage therapy effects on depression and somatic symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 3, 43-51.) Abstract
  • Thirty-four breast cancer patients were randomly assigned to a massage group or a control group. Patients of the massage group received two 30-min massages per week for 5 weeks. Depression and anxious depression were significantly reduced immediately after massage compared to the control group. (Krohn, M., Listing, M., Tjahjono, G., Reisshauer, A., Peters, E., Klapp, B.E., Rauchfuss, M. Depression, mood, stress, and Th1/Th2 immune balance in primary breast cancer patients undergoing classical massage therapy. Supportive Care in Cancer, Volume 19, Number 9, 1303-1311.) Abstract
  • The immediate effects of brief massage therapy, music relaxation with visual imagery, muscle relaxation, and social support group sessions were assessed in 100 hospital employees at a major public hospital. The effects of the therapies were assessed using a within-subjects pre-post test design and by comparisons across groups. The massage groups reported decreased anxiety, depression, fatigue, and confusion, as well as increased vigor following the session. (Field, T., Quintino, O., Henteleff, T., Wells-Keife, L. & Delvecchio-Feinberg, G. (1997). Job stress reduction therapies. Alternative Therapies, 3, 54-56.) Abstract
  • Twenty subjects with chronic fatigue immunodeficiency syndrome were randomly assigned either to a massage therapy or an attention control group. Although depression and anxiety scores were initially as high as clinically depressed patients, analyses of the before versus after therapy session measures on the first and last day of treatment revealed that immediately following massage therapy depression scores, pain, and cortisol levels decreased more in the massage group versus control group. (Field, T.M., Sunshine, W., Hernandez-Reif, M., Quintino, O., Schanberg, S., Kuhn, C., & Burman, I. (1997). Massage therapy effects on depression and somatic symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 3, 43-51.) Abstract
  • Thirty-two depressed adolescent mothers received ten 30-minute sessions of massage therapy or relaxation therapy over a five-week period. Subjects were randomly assigned to each group. Although both groups reported lower anxiety following their first and final sessions, only the massage therapy group showed behavioral and stress hormone changes, including a decrease in depression scores, anxious behavior, heart rate and cortisol levels. (Field, T., Grizzle, N., Scafidi, F., & Schanberg, S. (1996). Massage and relaxation therapies’ effects on depressed adolescent mothers. Adolescence, 31, 903-911.) Abstract
  • Adult fibromyalgia syndrome subjects were randomly assigned to a massage therapy, a transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS), or a transcutaneous electrical stimulation no-current group for 30-minute treatment sessions two times per week for 5 weeks. The massage therapy subjects reported lower anxiety and depression, and their cortisol levels were lower immediately after the therapy sessions on the first and last days of the study. The TENS group showed similar changes, but only after therapy on the last day of the study. (Sunshine, W., Field, T.M., Quintino, O., Fierro, K., Kuhn, C., Burman, I. & Schanberg, S. (1996). Fibromyalgia benefits from massage therapy and transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, 2, 18-22.) Abstract